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Tuesday, 28 May 2019

Three Basic Musts

                                           THREE BASIC MUSTS
Although clients tend to express their irrational beliefs in their own individual ways, it is helpful to consider irrational beliefs to be variations of three basic schemas or categories of musts. These involve the following types of demands:
1. Demands about self: These musts are frequently revealed in statements such as, “I must do well and be approved of by significant others, and if I’m not, then it’s awful,” or, “I can’t stand it, and I am a damnable person to some degree when I am not loved or when I do not do well.” Beliefs based on these musts often lead to anxiety, depression, shame, and guilt.
2. Demands about others: These musts are often expressed in statements like, “You must treat me well and justly, and it’s awful—I can’t bear it—when you don’t,” or, “You are damnable when you don’t treat me well, and you deserve to be punished for doing what you must not do.” Beliefs based on these musts are associated with the emotions of anger and rage and behaviors such as passive-aggression or violence.
3. Demands about the world/life conditions: These musts often take the form of beliefs such as, “Life conditions under which I live must absolutely be the way I want them to be, and if they are not, it’s terrible,” or, “I can’t stand it; poor me!” Such beliefs are associated with feelings of self-pity and hurt, as well as with problems of self-discipline (e.g., procrastination or addictive behavior).


Dr. Sunil Kumar                                             Dr. Jayasudha Kamaraj
Clinical Psychologist                                      Counseling Psychologist
founder, Mind Zone                                        Co-founder, Mind Zone
9444297058                                                    9176055660

irrational beliefs

When our beliefs are rigid, they are called irrational beliefs and take the form of musts, absolute shoulds, or have to’s. When clients adhere to rigid premises, they will tend to draw irrational conclusions on the basis of them. These irrational conclusions, or derivative irrational beliefs, take the following forms:
1. I-can’t-stand-it-it is (low frustration tolerance)
2. Damnation (of self, others, and/or life conditions)
3. Absolute-and-never, dichotomous thinking (e.g., that I will always fail or never be approved of by significant others).


Dr. Sunil Kumar                                        Dr. Jayasudha Kamaraj
Clinical Psychologist                                 Counselling Psychologist
Founder, Mind Zone                                  Co-founder, Mind Zone
9444297058                                               9176055660

Monday, 6 May 2019

MIND ZONE: motivation behind the internet addiction

MIND ZONE: motivation behind the internet addiction: Adlerian theory holds that people are goal-directed and purposeful in their behavior . Adler commented on human being goal-directed, “A pe...

MIND ZONE

motivation behind the internet addiction

Adlerian theory holds that people are goal-directed and purposeful in their behavior. Adler commented on human being goal-directed, “A person would not know what to do with himself were he not oriented toward some goal. We cannot think, feel, will, or act without the perception of some goal” (Ansbacher & Ansbacher, 1956)

Internet addicts are motivated by a purposeful goal, a quest to adventure upon to find belonging, significance, and to contribute. Consequently, the quest for connection, friendship, relationships, and love on social media sites, chat rooms, and virtual sex through pornography is inexorably tied to the longing to belong, to find significance, and to contribute. We are social creatures, and in our longing to be connected, we can sometimes reach out in unhealthy ways. Hence, teenagers are looking for belonging, connection, social acceptance, and contribution, and the Internet, in and of itself, provides a faux fulfillment of those longings.Adlerian strategy to find freedom from addiction is imbedded in discovering the true goal behind the substance use and helping the individual meet that goal in a healthier way.

Adlerian theory purports that humans are driven to superiority stemming from feelings of inferiority discovered earlier in life rooted in their desire to belong. These feelings of inferiority drive humans to belong, to find significance, and to contribute to society to compensate for those inferior feelings. However, striving to reach our goals to belong, to find significance, and contribute can be completed on the useful or the useless side of life; in other words, humans strive on the vertical plane (motivated by self-interest) or on the horizontal plane (motivated by community interest) (Griffith & Powers, 2007).

An Adlerian perspective of adolescent Internet addiction would be that the addiction is the expression of a  struggle to overcome their inferiority feelings. The addiction presents itself because of the lack of courage in the individual to face reality and their life tasks. The individuals selfishly retreats into the Internet out of fear of being discovered, and so is hesitant of relationships with others in the real world. The fear of having others uncover their inadequacies is too much to bear. These inferiority feelings are also linked to the sense of not belonging that so many addicts report. This inferiority could be linked to the sense of "not belonging" that so many addicts report (Young, 1998; Brown, 2014)

Internet addicts confess their inability to successfully maintain their relationships with others, and as a result, a sense of worthlessness pervades. Furthermore, if these individuals dealing with Internet addiction have not experienced belonging or significance in the real world, these feelings of worthlessness are even more potent (Young, 1998). Adlerian theory emphasizes the importance of one’s final fictional goal, and students struggling with compulsive Internet use,might create a new goal of protecting and hiding their worthlessness, so the Internet becomes the refuge. Now the individual mistakenly believes that he or she must live online in order to survive offline (Brown, 2014). In other words, the individual tries to eliminate feelings of inferiority through their continue retreat into the Web. This fear of failure is problematic because it prevents the individual from succeeding in one of the three main life tasks outlined by Adler (1956): work/school, friendship, and intimacy.

Adler in The Neurotic Constitution (1916) discoursed about self-indulgence as a lifestyle problem and considered alcoholism and addiction as a form of retrogressive movement and suggested that alcoholics are “pampered failures” who lack courage and social interest. Adler (1956) stated, "Very frequently the beginning of addiction shows an acute feeling of inferiority marked by shyness, a liking for isolation, oversensitivity, impatience, irritability, and by neurotic symptoms like anxiety, depression and sexual insufficiency" (p. 423). Laskowitz (1961), an Adlerian theorist, furthers this idea when he indicated, “The adolescent drug addict is socially distant, suffers from heightened feelings of inadequacy, lacks courage, desires to be shielded and pampered."


Dr. Sunil Kumar                                                 Dr. Jayasudha Kamaraj
Clinical Psychologist                                          Counseling Psychologist
Founder, Mind Zone                                           co-founder, Mind Zone
9444297058                                                        9176055660

MIND ZONE: 4th year anniversay of Mind Zone Psychiatric Hospi...

MIND ZONE: 4th year anniversay of Mind Zone Psychiatric Hospi...: celebrated 4 th year anniversary of mind zone on may, 3rd 2019 at Mind zone , Chennai.  Mr. Saidai Duraiswamy, Mr. Jawahar, Dr. Anbudora...

MIND ZONE

4th year anniversay of Mind Zone Psychiatric Hospital

celebrated 4 th year anniversary of mind zone on may, 3rd 2019 at Mind zone, Chennai.  Mr. Saidai Duraiswamy, Mr. Jawahar, Dr. Anbudorai, Mr. Paneer Selvan and Mr. Jayaranjan participated in the function.  

Friday, 26 April 2019

MIND ZONE: Dialectical Behaviour Therapy at Mind Zone, Chenna...

MIND ZONE: Dialectical Behaviour Therapy at Mind Zone, Chenna...: A lot of people struggle with overwhelming emotions . It’s as if the knob is turned to maximum volume on much of what they feel. When they...

MIND ZONE

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy at Mind Zone, Chennai

A lot of people struggle with overwhelming emotions. It’s as if the knob is turned to maximum
volume on much of what they feel. When they get angry or sad or scared, it shows up as a big,
powerful wave that can sweep them off their feet.

If you’ve faced overwhelming emotions in your life, you know what we’re talking about. There
are days when your feelings hit you with the force of a tsunami. And when that happens, it makes
you—understandably—afraid to feel things because you don’t want to get swept away by your
emotions. The trouble is, the more you try to suppress or put a lid on your emotions, the more
overwhelming they can get. 

What’s important to know right now is that trying to stop your feelings doesn’t work. There’s a fair amount of research to suggest that the likelihood of developing intense, overwhelming emotions may be hardwired from birth. But it can also be greatly affected by trauma or neglect during childhood

Trauma at critical points in our development can literally alter our brain structure in ways that make us more vulnerable to intense, negative emotions. However, the fact that a propensity to intense emotions is often rooted in genetics or trauma doesn’t mean the problem can’t be overcome. Thousands of people have used the skills you’ll can learn  to achieve better emotional control. They have changed their lives—and you can too.

So what are these skills, and how will they help you? Dialectical behavior therapy teaches four critically important skills that can both reduce the size of emotional waves and help you keep your balance when those emotions overwhelm you.

mind zone offers Dialectical Behavior Therapy for all the out patient and In- patient clients.  for further enquiry about DBT, feel free to contact in 9444297058  or 9176055660

Dr. Sunil Kumar                                                      Dr. Jayasudha Kamaraj
Clinical Psychologist                                               Counselling Psychologist
Founder                                                                    Co-founder
Mind Zone                                                               Mind Zone
+91 9444297058                                                      +91 9176055660 

Monday, 22 April 2019

Beliefs

Beliefs are conclusions that are reached as a result of past learning, whether this is directly from personal experience or indirectly assimilated through peer and parental pressures to conform to a "normal" way of thinking (for that culture).
Having perceived a situation in a certain way, i.e. having picked on an aspect of it that he considers most significant, the individual will then make an evaluation, according to his beliefs, about how he relates to that aspect of the situation. He will (perhaps semi-consciously) say a sentence to himself, based on an underlying assumption or belief.
This belief may be rational, i.e. based on reality and what exists and is logical, or it may be irrational, based on delusion, prejudice and ideas that are fixed and not open to inspection.
For example a person is nearly knocked over by a bus, and he infers that the driver was going too fast, and then believes rationally that the driver, like anyone else, is a fallible human being and he had better make more allowance for poor driving in future, when crossing the road. Alternatively, he may respond irrationally and say to himself that it is absolutely terrible that the driver should do such a thing, and if he could get hold of the driver he would shoot him. This is a greatly exaggerated evaluation based on an underlying irrational belief, that the driver's behavior was impossible to tolerate.


Dr. Sunil Kumar                                       Dr. Jayasudha Kamaraj
Clinical Psychologist                                Counseling Psychologist
Founder                                                     Co-founder
Mind Zone                                                Mind Zone
9444297058                                             9176055660

Tuesday, 16 April 2019

MIND ZONE: The Need for Psychiatric Hospital Admission

MIND ZONE: The Need for Psychiatric Hospital Admission: Person who has an issue with alcohol abuse or Drug use Alcohol and Drug related violence and aggression Alcohol and Drug related withd...

MIND ZONE